Surrogacy

Surrogacy is the process by which another woman carries a baby for an infertile or gay couple. There are two types of surrogacy, straight and host.

Host surrogacy uses the intended parent's embryo, or in the case of a gay couple, the father's sperm and an egg donor's egg.

Straight or traditional surrogacy uses the surrogates own eggs.

The surrogate mother uses her own egg fertilised with the intended father's sperm. This can be done using artificial insemination either at home or at a ferility clinic. The surrogate would be genetically related to the child and this carries a greater risk of the surrogate not wishing to hand the baby over to the intended parents after the baby is born.

Within the UK the surrogate has the right to change her mind if she decides she doesn't wish to part with the baby.

The surrogate mother carries the parent's genetic child, conceived by invitro-fertilisation (IVF) in a fertility clinic, for this treatment, the genetic mother would need functional ovaries. Alternatively an egg donor may be required. The IVF clinic would create an embryo from the intended parent's sperm and eggs and place into the surrogates womb.

Surrogacy is legal in the UK, however it is restricted by certain legal rules, which only allows arrangements that are informal and non-commercial. There must be no money changing hands other than any reasonable expenses.

If you have found someone personally who is willing to become a surrogate for you, then it is important to seek legal advice before making any arrangements for fertility treatment.

No, it is a criminal offence to negotiate a surrogacy arrangement on a commercial basis. Therefore adverts asking for surrogacy or those advertising themselves as surrogates are strictly not allowed on any part of our Pride Angel website, to include profiles, internal mail and the forum.

You may however say within your profile that you are looking for an egg donor for a surrogacy arrangement.

 

The law has recently changed to clarify that charities and non-profit organisations (such as COTS and Surrogacy UK) can legally help in arranging surrogacy agreements, even though they charge membership fees.

Using an surrogacy organisation allows you to receive all the specialist support you require such as counselling.

If you have found someone personally who is willing to become a surrogate for you, then it is important to seek legal advice before making any arrangements for fertility treatment.

It is not possible to enter into a legally binding agreement in the UK. This means that the surrogate mother can choose to keep the child, against the wishes of the intended parents. It does not mean that , if a surrogate mother changes her mind, that the intended parents can not make a claim. The courts look at each case individually and may allow the intended father or parents to apply for a residence order. 

We recommend using services such as Surrogacy UK and COTS, see the following links:

Surrogacy UK
Organisation offering support and information to anyone with an interest in surrogacy within the UK
www.surrogacyuk.org 

COTS - Childlessness overcome through surrogacy
Information on surrogacy within the UK
www.surrogacy.org.uk